Tag Archives: marissamumford

Anonymous Sources and Pseudonyms in Journalism

Posted by Marissa Mumford

The Washington Post recently published the gripping struggles of a sexually assaulted war veteran. Per her request, the source is identified only by her middle name, Diana. “Diana” pretends all is well while secretly accumulating doctor’s visits and battling stress and paranoia.

Credit to Leland Francisco, licensed under Creative Commons

Diana was viciously brutalized and hasn’t shared her story with family or friends. It isn’t the Washington Post’s job to make her pain known to the world. I understand that. Ethically, it feels right. But from a journalistic point of view, is this okay? If a prestigious news source is going to publish a lengthy piece on sexual abuse in the armed forces, shouldn’t the source be entirely verifiable?

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“Real” News: a Needle in a Haystack

Posted by Marissa Mumford

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Credit to Communicore82, Licensed under Creative Commons

A common frustration is apparent in many of the class’s blog posts as we witness front pages flooded with killer cats and celebrity baby announcements. So what is “news,” anyway? What deserves to make the front page? What is worth our attention and where can we get the best information?

 

It has become increasingly hard to know what true news is because we are bombarded with a constant barrage of information.

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CNN.com’s Homepage U.S. Centered

Posted by Marissa Mumfordcnn-logo

Lately, CNN.com’s homepage has been reminiscent of a teenager’s Twitter feed after a bad breakup: me, me, me. CNN.com is American news for American people.

Credit to Julia Folsom (https://www.flickr.com/photos/jfolsom/4870031933/in/photolist-8qmbPP-9ZG9qL-bEo9T4/) Licensed under Creative Commons

Credit to Julia Folsom
Licensed under Creative Commons

CNN.com has been my go-to source for news ever since I moved to the United States. I don’t have to concentrate to read through verbose, lengthy paragraphs and the website is designed for easy access.

Web Analytics Company Alexa reports that CNN.com is the 16th most popular website in the United States, while cnnpressroom.com reported 2.4 billion total page views across all platforms in 2013. CNN also has 11.8 million Twitter followers. Let that sink in.

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