Tag Archives: blog3

Bud Light Marketing Faces Criticism

Posted by Melissa S.
Photo by Michael Dorausch. No changes were made.

Photo by Michael Dorausch via Flickr. No changes were made.

Marketing errors happen. One company’s mistake will shortly be forgotten by the time the next scandal plays out. But with how often these occur, you’d think by now brands would get a second opinion. Earlier this week, Bud Light could have used a second opinion. Continue reading

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Ads versus content: BuzzFeed’s struggle

Posted by Sydney Price

On April 9, BuzzFeed deleted a post by Beauty Editor Arabelle Sicardi. Its removal sparked an uproar. The reason? The post criticized Dove’s new advertising campaign. The catch? Dove is a big advertiser on BuzzFeed. Ben Smith, BuzzFeed’s Editor-in-Chief, quickly apologized and put the post back up, calling it an issue with unclear standards for opinion writing. Twitter users who responded to Smith’s tweet had mixed reactions. Some praised his transparency and others questioned the legitimacy of BuzzFeed’s editorial standards.

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Coverage of the Fight for Fair Wages

By Kelsea Graham

Embed from Getty Images

April 14 was Equal Pay Day: A day symbolic of how far into the new year the average American woman would have to work to earn what the average man did the year before. Today, a day later, workers are rallying across the United States to raise the minimum wage to $15. The fight for fair wages seems to be creating controversy on its trending hashtag on Twitter. The result? Thorough coverage by a myriad of both local and national publications. Continue reading

What will come of Facebook’s potential new partnership with news organizations?

Facebook may be forming a new type of partnership with news organizations soon. While nothing is official yet, many people are concerned about the effect that this partnership could have on news content.

This partnership would allow news organizations to post their stories directly onto Facebook, differing from the current system that forces readers to follow a link to access news content.

Embed from Getty Images

This new partnership could bring in a great deal of revenue for news organizations.

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What MTV´s programs show

Posted by Sara Campillo

It seems like not too long ago when MTV was a channel where people could watch music videos and learn interesting things about their favorite artists. It’s hard to tell when this changed, but it obviously did. Somehow MTV has evolved into something that isn’t even related to music. Today, this channel is known to produce reality TV shows with questionable ethics.

“Teen Mom” may be a show with the highest shock value. This show is a continuation of another MTV favorite, “16 and pregnant”. Airing a show about young teenagers being pregnant was bad enough, but I have to say that by dragging on this concept through “Teen Mom”, made it seem as though MTV was encouraging this kind of behavior.

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Goodbye Photojournalism, Hello Amateurism: The Downfall of Journalism Specialists

Original illustration

Original illustration

In a gust of controversy, the Chicago Sun-Times fired its team of photojournalists earlier this year. The justification? Reporters armed with iPhone cameras can do the job just as well.

Is this practice the new paradigm? An article by Lou Carlozo recently questioned if photojournalists are a “digital casualty.” A main point of the Chicago Sun-Times’ decision, Carlozo says, was to devote more dough to video production (that is, reporters hitting “record” on their iPhones).

As more publications move online, users demand interactivity. Brands amp up multimedia, brainstorming new ways for users to click and browse. Online newspapers become flashier and more involving, and “play” buttons abound. But will old-fashioned print journalism—and the photographs that accompany it—be left in the dust?

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Net Neutrality: What is it and Where is it Headed?

Posted by Morgan DeBoest

Maybe you’ve heard of net neutrality. It’s probably come up on the news or in class, but you’ve never given it much thought. Common Cause‘s definition of net neutrality is “the principle that Internet users should be able to access any web content they choose and use any applications they choose, without restrictions or limitations imposed by their Internet service provider.”

Photo courtesy Steve Rhode

Photo courtesy Steve Rhode

So what does this mean? We are all able to use the Internet on our computers, phones, and tablets for as long as we can remember without giving the reason we can do that much thought. The freedom of expression and innovation has been widely available because Internet users haven’t been overly regulated by Internet providers. Net neutrality has been law since 2010 (when the FCC adopted it), but recently it’s been spun into a bit of a controversy.

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