blogs to book deals

Blogs to Book Deals:

blogz

I don’t usually stumble upon blogs. In fact I don’t know of anyone who just stumbles upon them. Nor do I know the originator of the stumble. [You know there has to be one.]

If there is someone, though, it’s probably some internet super human zombie that literally scours through millions of websites, doesn’t sleep, thrives off of five hour energy shots and Totino’s Pizza Rolls, just searching for funny blogs. He instantly tweets it. His million followers receive this link and suddenly it’s on like Donkey Kong.

Thus, I rely on all my other friends to point me in the direction of hilarious content and I do the same for them.

But what makes a blog good? And interesting. And funny. And relevant. No really. I would like to know. I keep attempting to start one. I always start off really strong. Three days, three posts. Then all of the sudden two days pass. “Oh shit, I need to blog about something.” Then a week passes. “Eh, I’ll do it tomorrow.” The next thing I know it’s November and I haven’t blogged in 3 months.

With movies like Julia and Julia, [essentially a movie about a woman creating a blog mapping out her experiences each day as she cooks like Julia everyday for one year and hoping for a book deal] and CNBC specials referencing the unemployed who enjoy completing extravagant ploys, [I just watched one where a woman is doing everything Oprah for one year] it’s no wonder we expect our blogs to be popular and make us rich. And get us book deals.

So what’s the ultimate goal behind blogging? I mean really, if you had to have a goal. It isn’t to update everyday with cool SEO jargon so people will read your opinion, [everyone knows it’s just a handful of your friends who feel bad, your friends who blog, and maybe you’re mom if she can get her head wrapped around the idea of a blog]. We all want to get famous. And be funny. So people will like us finally.

Book deals are apparently the trendy thing. If you have a blog and your content can somehow be put into print form, then dammit you better be striving to get a book published. I’m not sure if this blog would sell millions or not. My guess is not.

There are tons of blogs that give their opinion on how to get a book deal. I wouldn’t waste time with those. I would just go to the bookstore and find a book about it. They’re the ones that clearly did something right.

These are some of my favorite blogs. Some old, some new, some with book deals, some trying too hard to get one.

this is why you’re fat

awkward family photos

fuck my life

my life is average 

snacks and shit

the snuggie sutra

stuff white people like

look at that fucking hipster

texts from last night

So, why are you blogging?

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13 responses to “blogs to book deals

  1. Once upon a time, blogs were online journals. I think the reason behind a blog then evolved to be less for the writer and more for the audience.
    And that’s why I’m NOT blogging anymore: no one gives a shit about my ‘dear diary.’ And that’s fine, I wouldn’t either.

    But here’s some semi-personal blogs I like that, for some reason, people read.
    paigeworthy.com – She does dear diary with style. Very “Julie & Julia”–and yes, she’s writing a novel. I’m not sure why other people read her (I’m her sister, I need to know what’s going on in her life) but they do.
    angryblackbitch.blogspot.com – dear god, read it. She’s brilliant and brilliantly offensive. I strive to be a person who can curse like a sailor (in effect, maintain my voice) and manage to stay intelligent and widely read.

  2. What is the purpose of a blog? I, too, used to believe it was a personal journal published for friends or interested strangers to read. The next thing I know, Jack Cafferty and Sanjay Gupta have blogs and people are citing blogs as sources and accessing them for news information.

    I think the blog medium is still evolving because it can and is used for both silliness and “important issues.” Information consumers sometimes struggle to separate fact from fiction when they’re reading blogs. Some blogs look legitimate, but actually have biased or inaccurate content.

    In terms of what makes a personal blog successful: like you said, there has to be a hook. People are interested in experiments. That’s why we watch documentaries like “Super Size Me” and read blogs like Julie Powell’s. We like to see humans experience unique, unexpected and challenging things.

    I’m not really a “stumbler” or a “follower.” I don’t check FML or MLIA, and I’m also not a big YouTube explorer. I’m more of a “looker-upper.” I only come across blogs or videos when I’m seeking information on a specific topic. So, while I may not be the aspiring blogger’s target audience, I would still say blogs need a hook to get attention (or a book deal…) today, plain and simple.

  3. I have two blogs. One is for a class, and one is for work. So I blog basically because I have to. But I think blogs are also a really good way to get your name out there, especially if you are a writer. Through your blog, people can see your writing style. Also, I think blogs are much more personal. People might like to read the blog of their favorite writer because it gives them a glimpse into their life. I don’t think those personal diary blogs about “this is what I did today” are going to be successful without a spin. You have to give people a reason to want to read your blog. These people have lives to, they don’t care that you went out for pizza. But if you are going out for pizza to try and determine the best pizza spot in the world and keep an ongoing blog about it, people might want to read about it. That was kind of a lame example, but you get what I mean. I hope.

  4. I have two blogs. One is for a class, and one is for work. So I blog basically because I have to. But I think blogs are also a really good way to get your name out there, especially if you are a writer. Through your blog, people can see your writing style. Also, I think blogs are much more personal. People might like to read the blog of their favorite writer because it gives them a glimpse into their life. I don’t think those personal diary blogs about “this is what I did today” are going to be successful without a spin. You have to give people a reason to want to read your blog. These people have lives to, they don’t care that you went out for pizza. But if you are going out for pizza to try and determine the best pizza spot in the world and keep an ongoing blog about it, people might want to read about it. That was kind of a lame example, but you get what I mean. I hope.

  5. Blogs are great fun. But are they real journalism? I think they probably are. For instance, if Carrie Bradshaw were to be created today as opposed to the 90s (“Sex and the City” reference for those not following), she would more than likely have a cell phone and a blog, not a landline and a column. Blogs are the new “it” thing for journalism.

    The downside to blogs is that there are so many of them, and not all of them specifically relate to journalism. In fact, most of them do not. Blogs are like word vomit on the Net–everyone has one. It’s hard to keep track. It’s even harder to know which ones are worth reading.

    The goal behind blogging should be the same as with Twitter. It should be used to socially network your views into mainstream media. Because otherwise, aren’t you just wasting space?

  6. I don’t write my own blog. Yet.
    The reason for this is because I haven’t quite figured out the answer to your question yet- why do I want to blog? What do I want to blog about?

    I’d love to write intelligent and informed posts about current international affairs that show off my reporting and analytical skills to future employers. But as an otherwise-involved college student, I don’t really think I’d be able to do that very well at this point.

    I’d also enjoy publishing a completely different type of blog. I could write witty posts about personal revelations and jazz up my acute observations with some clever prose. But if I do decide to eventually take the serious, investigative reporter approach to my journalism degree, is that the sort of brand I want to have given myself?

    I’m sure that relatively soon I’ll get crackin’ on wordpress and think up a catchy URL and dive into the blogosphere… I just have no idea as of now what sort of product I want to create.

  7. This gets to why I love this class blog. It’s an outlet for what I, myself, find “interesting, funny and relevant.” But because it’s a collaborative blog, the “pressure to post” is lifted. With everybody sharing, it’s far more “interesting, funny and relevant” than if it were just me.

    There’s probably a lesson in there somewhere…

  8. I think you’re pretty right on this, and funny as well. Thank you for the new sites! Blogging really has turned into something that I think most see as (hopefully) a book deal in progress. Overall, I think that some have it, and some don’t. I’m blogging for J91 about community service http://thebestintentions.wordpress.com/ and although I’m finding it somewhat enjoyable wonder one: does anybody care? And also, is the amount of time it takes to worry, brainstorm, write and update a blog regularly really worth it? I want to keep my blog up after class, but like others, find myself postponing the next post….

  9. My original plan was to blog about my study abroad trip to London last semester, so I wrote an intro, but then I got so busy there that I completely forgot and never wrote again. Then this semester we have to blog for class, so I started again, writing about fashion. And I actually love it! Before my main problem was I didn’t know what to write about. Now I love it because I have a topic that I enjoy writing about, sharing knowledge, doing research… This whole online journalism thing is really growing on me.

  10. Like others that have posted, I also have a required blog that I write for J91. The trick is coming up with a topic that you have lots to say about. For me, I chose zombies. I’ve always been a fan of zombie movies, books, etc., and had plenty of opinions on them. Now, I can share them with an entire online community interested in the same things. Everyone has an opinion, and blogging is the easiest way to share. Like VanWyke said, the whole point is to keep the conversation going.

  11. ps my blog is http://www.zombieinformant.wordpress.com, in case anyone’s interested!

  12. I blog to familiarize myself with online social media. Another key reason is to improve my writing by ranting about things I am interested in. Finding a good tone and maintaining site visitors is what I aim to improve on through blogging. Keeping it concise and getting people to contribute through comments are also key. Let’s just say I’m working on it.

  13. @Sarah Chesnut

    did you check out the dm zombie walk last weekend? could have been some brilliant blog fodder.

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